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And here's what I read in 2016.

Have a cut. )
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Same conditions as immediately below.
edited to add a cut )
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I have fallen behind in posting my book logs. Let's see if I can catch up. Here's what I read in 2014.

(Doesn't include comics, comic book collections, or graphic novels generally, even though something like McCloud's The Sculptor takes enough time to really deserve inclusion. Doesn't include subscriptions to the ACBL Bulletin, The Bridge World, Asimov's Science Fiction or Uncanny. Still less blogs like Making Light or File 770.)

edited to add a cut )

A meme

Dec. 8th, 2016 10:52 pm
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Ganked from [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel.

Are you named after someone?
My father's father was named David, and my mother's father was named James. My mother told me that I wasn't deliberately named after them, they just liked the names. My father disagreed.

When is the last time you cried?
The Steven Universe episode "Mr. Greg" made me cry. Really cried, as opposed to just being moved by art? I honestly am not sure. Probably in 2001 when my grandparents died.

Do you like your handwriting?
No. It's always been kind of awkward and graceless.

What is your favorite lunch meat?
Roast beef.

Do you have kids?
No. I've never felt that I could do a proper job of it, and I'd much rather not do it than do it wrong.

Do you use sarcasm?
When I think it's called for.

Do you still have your tonsils?
Yes.

Would you bungee jump?
Sure, why not?

What is your favorite kind of cereal?
My local supermarket had a special on Kashi Toasted Berry Crisp and I liked it, so that's what I eat recently when I eat cereal, which isn't often. As a kid I really liked Lucky Charms but only got to eat it when I was with grandparents.

Do you untie your shoes when you take them off?
Um...yes? Not untying them has never really occurred to me as an option. How would I get them back on again?

Do you think you're strong?
No. I'd say I'm about average for a man my size, or a little below.

What is your favorite ice cream?
Chocolate. No question. However, if I'm having a sundae, I want vanilla: hot fudge on chocolate ice cream has too little flavor contrast.

What is the first thing you notice about people?
Probably the face.

Football or baseball?
Baseball. No question.

What is your least favorite thing about yourself?
Physically, my gut. Mentally, probably a lack of willpower.

What color pants are you wearing now?
Black.

What was the last thing you ate?
A combination plate with Caesar salad and turkey chili.

What are you listening to right now.
Nothing.

If you were a crayon, what color would you be?
???
I honestly can't actually think of an answer to this question.

Favorite smell?
Chocolate.

Who was the last person you spoke to on the phone?
My wife.

Favorite sport to watch?
I'm really not a spectator sport kind of guy. If I have to pick one, baseball.

Hair color?
Very dark brown / black, but with gray at the temples and spreading upwards.

Eye color?
Hazel.

Favorite food?
Chicago-style deep dish or stuffed pizza. Ideally the spinach and mushroom stuffed pizza from Zachary's in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Scary movies or happy ending?
These are hardly mutually exclusive. If the choice is pressed on me, I'll go with the happy ending.

Last movie you watched?
Arrival.

What color shirt are you wearing?
Gray, but with a maroon and navy striped sweater over it.
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
From [livejournal.com profile] wild_irises and [livejournal.com profile] james_nicoll.  I'm following [livejournal.com profile] wild_irises' lead and bolding one's I've read, and italicizing ones where I've read other things by that author.

Grimspace by Ann Aguirre
Primary Inversion by Catherine Asaro
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
Range of Ghosts by Elizabeth Bear
Flesh and Spirit by Carol Berg
Chime by Franny Billingsley
Daughter of the Blood by Anne Bishop
Tithe by Holly Black
The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett
Cordelia's Honor by Lois McMaster Bujold
War for the Oaks by Emma Bull
Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
Synners by Pat Cadigan

Foreigner by C.J. Cherryh
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
Survival by Julie E. Czerneda
Tam Lin by Pamela Dean
King's Dragon by Kate Elliott
Black Sun Rising by C.S. Friedman
Slow River by Nicola Griffith
Dragonsbane by Barbara Hambly
Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge
Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb
The God Stalker Chronicles by P.C. Hodgell

Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson
Valor's Choice by Tanya Huff
God's War by Kameron Hurley
The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin
Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
Daggerspell by Katharine Kerr
The Steerswoman by Rosemary Kirstein
Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress
Deryni Rising by Katherine Kurtz

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan
The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin
Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie

Ash by Malinda Lo
Warchild by Karin Lowachee
Legend by Marie Lu
Dragonsong by Anne McCaffrey
Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire
Dreamsnake by Vonda N. McIntyre

The Thief's Gamble by Juliet E. McKenna
Sunshine by Robin McKinley
His Majesty's Dragon by Naomi Novik

Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor
Diving into the Wreck by Kristine Kathryn Rusch
The Female Man by Joanna Russ
Old Man's War by John Scalzi

A Door Into Ocean by Joan Slonczewski
The Grass King's Concubine by Kari Sperring
The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
City of Pearl by Karen Traviss
Her Smoke Rose Up Forever by James Tiptree, Jr.
The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente
The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge
Farthing by Jo Walton

The Cloud Roads by Martha Wells
To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Me to Katie: "It occurs to me that I love you."
Katie: "Ha. I counter that by saying that I love you."
(beat)
Me: "Mornington Crescent!"
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
From [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel:

NPR's top 100 SF/F books

Bold = have read
Underline = haven't read, but have seen the movie
Italic = didn't finish
! = a favorite
strikethru = you couldn't pay me enough to read this
? Is this really worth reading, or is it over-hyped?

1. The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy, by J.R.R. Tolkien !
2. The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy, by Douglas Adams !
3. Ender's Game, by Orson Scott Card
4. The Dune Chronicles, by Frank Herbert (read the first three, no more)
5. A Song Of Ice And Fire Series, by George R. R. Martin
6. 1984, by George Orwell
7. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
8. The Foundation Trilogy, by Isaac Asimov
9. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
10. American Gods, by Neil Gaiman
11. The Princess Bride, by William Goldman

12. The Wheel Of Time Series, by Robert Jordan ?
13. Animal Farm, by George Orwell
14. Neuromancer, by William Gibson
15. Watchmen, by Alan Moore !
16. I, Robot, by Isaac Asimov

17. Stranger In A Strange Land, by Robert Heinlein
18. The Kingkiller Chronicles, by Patrick Rothfuss
19. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut

20. Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
21. Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?, by Philip K. Dick
22. The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood

23. The Dark Tower Series, by Stephen King
24. 2001: A Space Odyssey, by Arthur C. Clarke
25. The Stand, by Stephen King
26. Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson
27. The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury

28. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
29. The Sandman Series, by Neil Gaiman !
30. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
31. Starship Troopers, by Robert Heinlein

32. Watership Down, by Richard Adams
33. Dragonflight, by Anne McCaffrey (And all the other Pern books up thru The White Dragon. After that I slowly lost interest.) (the preceding is [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel's comment, but it applies to me too....)
34. The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, by Robert Heinlein
35. A Canticle For Leibowitz, by Walter M. Miller
36. The Time Machine, by H.G. Wells

37. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, by Jules Verne
38. Flowers For Algernon, by Daniel Keys
39. The War Of The Worlds, by H.G. Wells
40. The Chronicles Of Amber, by Roger Zelazny
41. The Belgariad, by David Eddings ?
42. The Mists Of Avalon, by Marion Zimmer Bradley
43. The Mistborn Series, by Brandon Sanderson
44. Ringworld, by Larry Niven
45. The Left Hand Of Darkness, by Ursula K. LeGuin
46. The Silmarillion, by J.R.R. Tolkien
47. The Once And Future King, by T.H. White
48. Neverwhere, by Neil Gaiman
49. Childhood's End, by Arthur C. Clarke

50. Contact, by Carl Sagan
51. The Hyperion Cantos, by Dan Simmons
52. Stardust, by Neil Gaiman
53. Cryptonomicon, by Neal Stephenson

54. World War Z, by Max Brooks
55. The Last Unicorn, by Peter S. Beagle !
56. The Forever War, by Joe Haldeman
57. Small Gods, by Terry Pratchett

58. The Chronicles Of Thomas Covenant, The Unbeliever, by Stephen R. Donaldson (read the first two trilogies, but not the third)
59. The Vorkosigan Saga, by Lois McMaster Bujold !
60. Going Postal, by Terry Pratchett
61. The Mote In God's Eye, by Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle
62. The Sword Of Truth, by Terry Goodkind (read the first one, not the rest)
63. The Road, by Cormac McCarthy
64. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke !
65. I Am Legend, by Richard Matheson

66. The Riftwar Saga, by Raymond E. Feist
67. The Shannara Trilogy, by Terry Brooks (again, first one and not the rest)
68. The Conan The Barbarian Series, by R.E. Howard
69. The Farseer Trilogy, by Robin Hobb
70. The Time Traveler's Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger
71. The Way Of Kings, by Brandon Sanderson
72. A Journey To The Center Of The Earth, by Jules Verne

73. The Legend Of Drizzt Series, by R.A. Salvatore
74. Old Man's War, by John Scalzi
75. The Diamond Age, by Neil Stephenson
76. Rendezvous With Rama, by Arthur C. Clarke

77. The Kushiel's Legacy Series, by Jacqueline Carey
78. The Dispossessed, by Ursula K. LeGuin
79. Something Wicked This Way Comes, by Ray Bradbury
80. Wicked, by Gregory Maguire
81. The Malazan Book Of The Fallen Series, by Steven Erikson
82. The Eyre Affair, by Jasper Fforde
83. The Culture Series, by Iain M. Banks

84. The Crystal Cave, by Mary Stewart
85. Anathem, by Neal Stephenson
86. The Codex Alera Series, by Jim Butcher
87. The Book Of The New Sun, by Gene Wolfe
88. The Thrawn Trilogy, by Timothy Zahn
89. The Outlander Series, by Diana Gabaldan
90. The Elric Saga, by Michael Moorcock
91. The Illustrated Man, by Ray Bradbury
92. Sunshine, by Robin McKinley
93. A Fire Upon The Deep, by Vernor Vinge !
94. The Caves Of Steel, by Isaac Asimov

95. The Mars Trilogy, by Kim Stanley Robinson
96. Lucifer's Hammer, by Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle
97. Doomsday Book, by Connie Willis [1]
98. Perdido Street Station, by China Mieville
99. The Xanth Series, by Piers Anthony (Anything beyond the first 3 books is a waste of ink.) (again I agree with [livejournal.com profile] starcat_jewel)
100. The Space Trilogy, by C.S. Lewis
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Time for my annual post about the books I've read last year. Under a cut:
Read more... )
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I contributed to the IndieGoGo for Jenna Moran's Enemies Endure. One of the rewards for my level was the ebooks of An Unclean Legacy and The Fable of the Swan. Only trouble is, I'd already bought both of those when they first went up. So now I have duplicates.

Anybody out there want 'em?
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
On this last day of the candy year, let's take a moment to contemplate before the fallow season starts.

You all know the seasons of the candy year, right? September 1st through October 30th is Halloween. October 31st through December 24th is Christmas, December 25th to February 13th is Valentine's, and February 14th through Holy Saturday is Easter. Then Easter Sunday through August 31st is the fallow season, when there is no actually seasonal candy being pushed. It gives us all some months to rest before the new candy year starts.

A meme

Feb. 2nd, 2012 12:57 am
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Gacked from [personal profile] kouredios

I’m running a test to see who’s reading my posts. So, if you read this, leave me a one-word comment about your day that starts with the third letter of your LJ USERNAME. Only one word please. Then repost so I can leave a word for you. Don’t just post a word and not copy – that’s not as much fun!
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Time for my annual roundup of what I read last year.

Total number of titles was way down, although I suspect the number of words and pages was comparable: it was a year of doorstops! I read the first volume of Mark Twain's autobiography, then I re-read all of A Song of Ice and Fire, then I read A Dance With Dragons, then I read the first volume of Brandon Sanderson's new doorstop series, and then I said to myself, "Self, you've been reading all these doorstop novels, why not cap it off with the ultimate doorstop?" So I went and read War and Peace.

(As it happened, a friend had given me a copy of it as a gift some years ago, so I had it on my shelf.)

Here's the full list, behind a cut:
Read more... )
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Because I'm a little bored, and this sounds like it might be fun. From [livejournal.com profile] caper_est:

Instructions

1. Open up your music player. Hit shuffle.
2. Record the first few lines of the first 20 songs that come up that do not give away the name of the song. Skip instrumentals, but don't skip the embarrassing ones.
3. Make hapless LJ denizens guess the song names and artists. Google is cheating. For musical songs, the name of the musical is acceptable in place of the artist.
4. Least hapless LJ denizen wins admiration.

1. Hey now everybody now, hey now everybody, hey now everybody now.
2. I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me.
3. How I remember sleepless nights, when we would read by candlelight.
4. I am sitting in the morning at the diner on the corner.
5. I heard a sound. I turned around. I turned around to find the thing that made the sound.
6. All the people are so happy now, their heads are caving in. I'm glad they are a snowman with protective rubber skin.
7. Asked the girl what she wanted to be. She said, "Baby, can't you see?"
8. The world is treating me bad.
9. All dressed up, with nowhere to go.
10. Well, I was born an original sinner, I was born from original sin.
11. I used to see in my reflection a hundred broken hearts.
12. You know you made me cry. I see no use in wondering why.
13. What would you think if I sang out of tune? Would you stand up and walk out on me?
14. I walk the streets alone. On feeble bones I ride. My sins are etched in stone. I got no place to hide.
15. Nobody knows what it's like, to be the bad man. To be the sad man.
16. Got a little black book with my poems in, got a bag with a toothbrush and a comb in.
17. I never should have traded you. Is there anything, anything I can do to start to try and make amends?
18. "There must be some way out of here," said the joker to the thief.
19. It won't be easy. You'll think it strange, when I try to explain how I feel.
20. I was working all night in my office, when a man I had recently killed called me up from the phone near my building, so I looked out the window at him.

My music runs a lot to instrumentals -- #20 here is #94 on the player. (I did have to skip over some that had a title drop early on.) I counted "Evolution of the Daleks" and "Duel of the Fates" as instrumentals, as I didn't care to try to transcribe their lyrics phonetically.
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
So, two weeks ago I got a message from acx.com saying that my recording of Ursus of Ultima Thule had been approved, that it would undergo a final quality check which would take about a week, and then go up in places like audible.com. I've kept looking on audible.com and not seen it; I decided to wait for it to be two complete weeks before sending a message asking "What's going on?". Just before starting the process of sending that message, I looked again...and there it is!

So if you think you'd like to spend 7+ hours listening to me read you a quirky swords-and-sorcery novel with some stream of consciousness bits in and an ending which inverts the usual Freudian analysis of the sword-and-sorcery genre, I encourage you to go and buy it.
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Many of you may remember that I worked on a dramatic reading of Alice in Wonderland for the free downloadable audiobook site LibriVox. Well, the person who did Alice didn't have the ability to do something similar for Through the Looking-Glass, so I stepped up and organized it. 27 different people recorded 42 different parts, and I edited them all together. It's finally all done! You can download the chapters as separate files here:
http://librivox.org/through-the-looking-glass-dramatic-reading-by-lewis-carroll/

It was six months in the making. I'm very proud of it.
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Gakked from [livejournal.com profile] james_nicoll
Beginning with authors who got their start in the 1980s:

Italicize the authors you've heard of before reading this list of authors, bold the ones you've read at least one work by, underline the ones of whose work you own at least one example of.

Long, so a cut.

Read more... )
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Over on My Mom Watches Game of Thrones the mom says:
...the Lannisters are bad, but it might be Tyrion who ends up saving Ned.
Instantly I felt the urge to quote The Princess Bride...only in reverse. (With Ned Stark in the role of Prince Humperdinck, if you need a clue.)
davidgoldfarb: (Default)
Harper Collins is having a contest: the prize is a trip to New York to record a role in the new audiobook of American Gods. To enter, people load an mp3 file of themselves reading a paragraph from the book. Registered users on the Harper Collins web site can vote for files, and the top 20 votegetters get judged. (The rules specify that if fewer than 20 entries are received, then all entries will reach the final judging. This made me giggle just on reading. And indeed, as I type this the contest [which runs for 21 days] has been going less than 24 hours and already has more than 400 entries.)

Well, my submission is here: http://neilgaiman.bookperk.com/engine/Details.aspx?PageType=APPROVED&ContestID=29933&SubmissionID=7784521&IncrementNumber=1

I encourage everyone to go and listen to my entry, and if you feel it's worthy and you also feel that registering with Harper Collins isn't too onerous, to vote for it.

(More than once, even: the contest rules allow any one person to vote once per day....)